Monkeys ‘falling out of trees like apples’ in Mexico amid brutal heatwave

Last Updated: June 16, 2024By

image

Howler Monkeys Falling from Trees in Mexico’s Scorching Heat

image


It’s scorching hot in Mexico right now. It’s so hot that howler monkeys are dropping dead from the trees!

image

At least 83 howler monkeys, known for their loud roars, have been found dead in Tabasco, a state on Mexico’s Gulf coast. Some lucky ones were saved by locals, including five rushed to a vet who tried his best to save them.

image

“They came in really bad shape, totally dehydrated and feverish,” said Dr. Sergio Valenzuela. “They were as limp as wet noodles. It was heatstroke.”

image

Mexico’s terrible heatwave has taken the lives of at least 26 people since March. But for howler monkeys, veterinarians and rescuers believe the death toll could be dozens or even hundreds.

image

In Tecolutilla, a town in Tabasco, dead monkeys began showing up on Friday. A local volunteer fire-and-rescue team brought in five of them in a truck.

image

Dr. Valenzuela quickly put ice on their tiny hands and feet and hooked them up to IV drips.

image

Thankfully, these monkeys are starting to get better. Once they were lifeless and easy to handle, but now they’re caged in Dr. Valenzuela’s office, showing signs of recovery. “They’re getting better. They’re biting again, which is a good sign,” he said, explaining that healthy howler monkeys are usually quite elusive and defensive.

image

But not all monkeys have been so fortunate. Wildlife biologist Gilberto Pozo found around 83 of them either dead or dying on the ground beneath trees. This tragedy began around May 5 and peaked over the weekend.

image

“They were falling out of the trees like apples,” Pozo said. “They were extremely dehydrated and died within minutes.” He also pointed out that the falls from such heights caused even more damage, often finishing them off.

image

Pozo believes the deaths are due to a combination of extreme heat, drought, forest fires, and logging. These factors have deprived the monkeys of essential water, shade, and food.

image

“These monkeys are like a warning sign,” Pozo said, comparing them to the canaries used in coal mines to detect danger. “They’re telling us something important about climate change.”

Pozo’s team has set up special recovery stations for the monkeys. They currently have five monkeys there, but birds and reptiles are also affected. They are working hard to get more specialized vets to help care for the animals.

By May 9, at least nine cities in Mexico had broken temperature records. In Ciudad Victoria, Tamaulipas, temperatures hit a blistering 117°F (47°C).

With lower-than-average rainfall across nearly the whole country this year, lakes and dams are drying up, water supplies are dwindling, and authorities have had to truck in water for hospitals and firefighting teams. Low water levels at hydroelectric dams have even led to power blackouts in some areas.

People are struggling with the heat too. On Monday, OXXO, Mexico’s largest convenience store chain, announced it was limiting ice purchases to just two or three bags per customer in some locations.

The brutal heatwave in Mexico is taking a heavy toll on both humans and animals, and the story of the howler monkeys is a stark reminder of the impact of climate change.

latest video

news via inbox

Nulla turp dis cursus. Integer liberos  euismod pretium faucibua

Leave A Comment